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Support and Advice from TNPC's Parenting Experts

Does your teenage son want a summer job? Are you wondering how to convince him that he needs to start doing something about it right now?
Teens looking for summer work should start serious job hunting tactics no later than March 1. If he doesn’t believe you, there are some good resource books in your local library about teen job hunting. You may also want to consider getting him a copy of the revised “Princeton Review Student Advantage Guide to Summer Programs.” Confusing title, but good tips. (Random House/Princeton Review Books, $18)
Here are some examples of tips in this book:
* Ways to Start Early…use present contacts
* Networking…using parent, neighbor and friend contacts
* City jobs…often overlooked.
* Good interviews…what to say and how to practice
* On the job smarts…how to keep the job you land
Help your child prepare to go job hunting by doing a resume. Most kids do not know how to do a good summer job resume. You, as parents, can help with this. Be sure they include information about school, grades, attendance, extra curricular activities, honors and awards. Include information on hobbies, interests, and/or volunteer work that have taught your child real skills. List any job experiences, even volunteer type. Keep the resume clear and simple with lists and bullets; one page maximum. Include phone number!
Make sure your child understands that applications will need to be filled out, no matter where he or she goes hunting. Teens should dress properly, even if all they do on first contact is fill out the application. They should take along good pens or pencils that work, white out, and a small stapler. After filling out the application, they should staple the resume to it. This can make the difference in having their application make it to the manager instead of the wastebasket.
Most import, be sure your teen knows the importance of following up on job applications IN PERSON, looking clean and neat. Often, the best way to get a job is to keep going to the place over and over until someone really takes notice and knows you are serious.


Evelyn Petersen’s nationally syndicated parenting column is carried in over 200 newspapers twice each week. As a family/parenting consultant, early childhood educator, Head Start consultant, and host of a series of parent training audio and video tapes, Ms. Petersen employs an approach of providing hands-on, nuts and bolts advice to parents across the country.Evelyn Petersen’s nationally syndicated parenting column is carried in over 200 newspapers twice each week. As a family/parenting consultant, early childhood educator, Head Start consultant, and host of a series of parent training audio and video tapes, Ms. Petersen employs an approach of providing hands-on, nuts and bolts advice to parents across the country. You can read more from Evelyn at her web site: www.askevelyn.com

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